Take Me to Art 11/16/19: Postwar Women at the Art Students’ League

What is the case for exhibiting women artists as women artists?  Postwar Women, at the Art Students’ League through December 1st, unites the visions of women artists in the later twentieth century in such a way as to both pose and answer questions of how women artists see, and to make a case for collecting these visions in one space that tells a story across painting, sculpture, and mixed media.

Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold both look into the past, in some cases the very distant past.  Catlett’s “Standing Mother and Child” and “The Door of Justice” both recall African mask traditions (I am not an expert, but for me they evoke the Dean gle of the Dan people of Liberia) in the stylized but steady faces…

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“Standing Mother and Child” and “The Door of Justice,” Elizabeth Catlett

…while Faith Ringgold recontextualizes the famous remains of “Lucy” as those of a beloved ancestor by placing a miniature skeleton in a gold coffin, surrounded by flowers and colorful fabric.  The scale is intimate and familiar, the notes in block printing on plain white paper, bringing Lucy out of the museum and into a setting that feels funereal, reverent, and joyous all at once.

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“Lucy, the 3.5 Million Year Old Lady,” Faith Ringgold

Catlett and Ringgold both look behind to look forward, reaching into the past to bring dignity and tenderness to depictions of people of African heritage.  The explicit embrace of African history and artistic traditions reminds me of El Anatsui or Yinka Shonibare; the affection the artists radiate towards their subjects brings to mind Kehinde Wiley.  But ultimately, the modest dimensions lead to a different interpretation, distinct from Shonibare’s irony or Wiley’s grandeur: Catlett and Ringgold, by way of the familial and fond, draw the viewer’s attention to the ways in which people of color have been dehumanized and embrace them with seriousness and profundity.

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Take Me to Church 11/3/19: Can You Sell Your Canoe?

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Photo by Muradi on Unsplash.

Empire, as a concept, is built on lies. (I’ll pause for a moment to let us all contemplate the delicious irony of the Empire State, where so many of us call home.)  You can think of any number of lies that exist solely to prop up hegemony, colonialism, the rampant abuses of late-stage capitalism.  Poor people are poor because they don’t work hard.  Conversely, Work hard enough and you, too, can become rich.  Closely related: Some people don’t deserve [x] because [y], never mind the fact that a great many people who seem to be holding on to [x] just fine cannot point to anything, or at least not anything truly supererogatory, that would mark them as deserving.

But one of the most pernicious, insidious lies of empire is the lie of Never Enough.  It’s one of the most foundational and therefore the most difficult to uproot.  And maybe the only lie harder to uproot from our empire thinking than Never Enough Money is Never Enough Time. Because, as the thinking goes, you can always make more money, but you can’t make more time.

Or can you?

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Take Me to Church 10/20/19: Collective Memory, Collective Blessings

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From upper left: Photo by Deva Darshan on Unsplash; Photo by mostafa meraji on Unsplash; Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash.

Giving to church has changed in some ways since I was confirmed in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America in 1997.  Judson accepts gifts in the time-honored forms of cash and checks, of course, but plenty of people donate via Venmo, and we break up our yearly pledge into monthly credit card payments.  So I rarely find myself digging in my wallet for cash to stuff an envelope the way I did when I was a teenager.  But I gave, obviously in paltry amounts, from a young age, as the daughter of a church treasurer who reminded me that churches were not exempt from the demands of Pennsylvania Power and Light or the elevator repair service. Unsexy though that may sound, it’s still a stewardship narrative, and as the year leans towards an end, there’s no shortage of them around our church and many others.

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Take Me to Church 9/22/19: Seeding in Autumn

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Photo by Joshua Lanzarini on Unsplash.

Autumn isn’t typically the time of year to be thinking about planting seeds.  It’s the time of harvest, the time of storing up and shoring up.  But in the wake of the Climate March and Strike, we found ourselves today wondering what seeds we can plant, among ourselves and others, to inspire change and movement around the coming chaos, disaster, and mass death that unchecked climate change will surely bring.

And so I found myself wondering if things might have been different if the environmental movement had had a different message all along. When I was growing up, and maybe even as recently as a few years ago, I received the message of the environmental movement as a message about the Earth: protect the Earth, keep it clean.  I dutifully recycled and took public transit and ate no, or at least less, meat.  But Greta Thunberg and her young allies in climate activism put it bluntly: The future for young people looks fragile, even bleak, indeed, and even more fragile and bleak for the young people of the developing world.  The Earth will survive us if necessary.  But we will not survive an Earth that is rapidly warming, flooding, storming, and burning, much of it aggravated (even if all of not directly caused) by human activity.  Climate change deniers may scoff at the idea of protecting the spotted owl from extinction until they realize, likely too late, how the spotted owl (or any other vulnerable species) is also a canary in a coal mine.

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Take Me to Church 9/8/19: New School Year, New Heart

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Photo by Anthony Intraversato on Unsplash

Even if you’re not personally going “back to school,” as it were, September nevertheless feels like a return to schooling after summer, in which stasis and idleness is forgiven, even rewarded, as one tries to conserve energy and juiciness under the hot suns of the bright months.  I’m not sure how much I evolved spiritually this past summer.  I read over a thousand pages of Anne Brontë in the long heat of July, which, given their almost relentless and irredeemable bleakness, I do not recommend; I delayed completing my already-long-delayed draft of a novel I’ve been trying to write for the better part of five years; and, of course, if you’ve been keeping up with this blog (which of course you have), you’ve noticed I’ve been a little quiet here as I try to figure out how to keep sharing my creative offerings but also look into sharing my work with larger audiences.  So I returned to church this morning after (another) two-week absence for what many churches call “Rally Day”: the return of Sunday School for children, and, for the adult spiritual truants, a return to the Psalms and the prayers and the quiet anxiety of sitting with our own hearts in the space of the Meeting Room, under the new lights we haven’t gotten used to yet, wondering what might be revealed.

If I sound tired before the “new school year,” so to speak, is even a week old, I don’t think I’m alone.  “What most of us want,” Donna said in her sermon, “is to just not lose anything else.”  It’s no way to receive the great gift of salvation, we all know, but that doesn’t make it any easier, not in the face of so much disaster.  As I try to write this, Bahamians trying to come to the United States to take refuge with family and friends from the wreckage of Hurricane Dorian are being turned away without the visas they’ve never been required to have before.  Is everything going to be all right?  Can it be?  Who knows?

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Poem: Last Fruits

I haven’t posted a poem in a while; I’m slowly trying to submit pieces to publications and competitions, and some guidelines around previous publishing are pretty strict.  But I’m going to share this one because I’m sure the end of Labor Day weekend has us all contemplating the approach of autumn, and one of the first signs is likely to be at your local fruit stand.

Photo credits: top, Photo by Roman Davayposmotrim on Unsplash; bottom, photo by Josefin on Unsplash.

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Take Me to the Beach 8/25/19: And Also Much Plushies

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Beach at North Wildwood looking south.

I accidentally re-discovered a consistently brilliant part of summer two summers ago: I secretly planned a trip to Wildwood, New Jersey for Dakota’s birthday over Labor Day weekend, and we had so much fun that we’ve gone back for the subsequent two summers.  The key here is giving yourself over to the entire idea of fun, and a very specific kind of it: you need to roll the quarters you’ve saved all year for the arcade games that still accept quarters and not a prepaid card; you need to accept the idea that you are not going to eat anything healthy for a couple of days; you need to not get too attached to the particular look and shape of any individual plushie and allow yourself to be delighted by whatever the claw picks up and drops down the hatch.  (Succeed at the latter and you, too, can be an adult hauling home fourteen stuffed animals.)

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Including two different Hello Kitties.

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